Intel retires iconic Pentium and Celeron chips in PCs and laptops

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Chip-maker has bid goodbye to Pentium and Celeron processors and has introduced a new chip for upcoming essential segment or budget computers.



The company has introduced ‘ Processor’ that will replace Pentium and Celeron branding in the 2023 notebook product stack.


“The new Processor branding will simplify our offerings so users can focus on choosing the right processor for their needs,” said Josh Newman, Intel vice president and interim GM of Mobile Client Platforms.


Intel said that with this new brand architecture, it will continue to sharpen its focus on its flagship brands: Intel Core, Intel Evo and Intel vPro.


In addition, this update streamlines brand offerings across PC segments to enable and enhance Intel customer communication on each product’s value proposition, while simplifying the purchasing experience for customers, the company said in a statement late on Friday.


Introduced in 1993, Pentium chips were first introduced in high-end desktop machines, and later to laptops.


Intel introduced Celeron for low-cost PCs in 1998. The first Celeron chip was based on a Pentium II processor.


The company said that the new ‘Intel Processor’ will serve as the brand name for multiple processor families, helping to simplify the product purchase experience for consumers.


“Intel will continue to deliver the same products and benefits within segments. The brand leaves unchanged Intel’s current product offerings and Intel’s product roadmap,” it added.


The rebranding came as the company is geared up to launch its flagship 13th Gen desktop processors.


“Intel is committed to driving innovation to benefit users, and our entry-level processor families have been crucial for raising the PC standard across all price points,a said Newman.


–IANS


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(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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